AD Blog 2: Hugs, not drugs

If you have been seeing a sudden increase in pharmaceutical commercials, it’s not just you. These commercials are one of the many examples that the advertising and healthcare industry is trying to push prescription drugs towards potential users as a placebo for users to think they actually need something to live a better life.

According to Richard Pollay, advertising creates false notions and artificial hopes along with creating an influential language in society. He also considers advertisements as pervasive and repetitive because they appear in many different ways on various types of media mediums while driving reinforcement. It is professionally developed, meaning that the research done behind these commercials increase attention and retention helping people create a fake notion of actually needing something when in actuality they do not. Pollay also adds that advertisements detach from traditional sources, such as  families, churches or schools.

Although these types of advertisements gets people to talk to their doctor and have discussions about health concerns. However, there are doctors out there that potentially have limited knowledge about these commercial advertised drugs because of how new they are in the healthcare industry. This draws an unnecessary need for these medications for most people who develop a false perception of these medications thinking that it could potentially better an individual’s life. These commercials integrate key highlights that focuses on family and living a healthier life. Though commercials do not provide clarity or enough information about these prescription drugs, nor does it benefit or enhance a better healthcare experience with physicians. If anything, these pharmaceutical commercials are generating patient pressure upon physicians to prescribe them these commercial advertised commercials, according to Vox.

An accurate (joke) chart of what these commercials actually consist.

An accurate (joke) chart of what these commercials actually consist.